sample-img-04.jpg
14102170_1085885634826826_5409608872638024060_n.jpg
business-name-registration-1-728.jpg
sample-img-04.jpg

World Bamboo Organization


The World Bamboo Organization is a diverse group consisting of individual people, commercial businesses, non-profit associations, institutions, and allied trade corporations that all share a common interest = BAMBOO.

SCROLL DOWN

World Bamboo Organization


The World Bamboo Organization is a diverse group consisting of individual people, commercial businesses, non-profit associations, institutions, and allied trade corporations that all share a common interest = BAMBOO.

WBO: Keeping Bamboo Strong.

The World Bamboo Organization is a diverse group consisting of individual people, commercial businesses, non-profit associations, institutions, and allied trade corporations that all share a common interest = BAMBOO. The purpose of the WBO is to improve and promote this common interest, as well as the conditions affecting, and the industry surrounding, this common interest. We are dedicated to promoting the use of bamboo and bamboo products for the sake of the environment and economy.

 

Our Mission

The World Bamboo Organization is a diverse group consisting of individual people, commercial businesses, non-profit associations, institutions, and allied trade corporations that all share a common interest = BAMBOO. The purpose of the WBO is to improve and promote this common interest, as well as the conditions affecting, and the industry surrounding, this common interest. We are dedicated to promoting the use of bamboo and bamboo products for the sake of the environment and economy.

We are a United States tax-exempt trade association (U.S. 501-c6, est. 2005) formed to facilitate the exchange of information from around the world on the environmental, socioeconomic, biological, and cultural aspects of bamboo. By bringing together local and regional bamboo people and creating mechanisms for global communications, the WBO’s goal is to facilitate the development of new partnerships and alliances to advance the causes of bamboo and furthering the efforts of bamboo practitioners worldwide. We play a crucial networking role by connecting people for useful collaborations on all things related to bamboo.

Originally founded as the International Bamboo Association (IBA), the idea for an international coordinating body for bamboo practitioners was born out of discussions at the 1991 International Bamboo Workshop in Chiangmai, Thailand.

The IBA was consequently established at the 1992 International Bamboo Congress in Japan. Through 1998, the IBA had been the coordinating platform for bamboo people around the world, with its primary responsibility being the International Bamboo Congress & International Bamboo Workshop. A union of these two distinct gatherings is today called the World Bamboo Congress, and has lead to the re-birth of the IBA into the World Bamboo Organization.

The founding members of the WBO include Susanne Lucas (USA), I.V. Ramanuja Rao (India), Karina Quintans (USA), David Flanagan (USA), Carmelita Bersalona (Philippines), Amin Samuel Zacca (Ghana), Jorge Campos (Chile), Victor Brias (Belgium).

Dedicated volunteers administer our organization. An Honorary Council was established in 2005 to support WBO with professional consultation and expertise, in the field as well as in the conference room. The Honorary Council has evolved and has been re-named to better reflect the horizontal structure of our collaborations in the name of bamboo. We are now collectively called Bamboo Ambassadors

Michel Abadie (Paris, France) served his first term as President from 2010-2012, and was reappointed a second term in 2013-2015. Kamesh Salam (Assam, India) served as President 2007-2009. Susanne Lucas is the CEO.

 

Apart from our day-to-day networking activities, every 3 to 4 years WBO organizes a World Bamboo Congress, (WBC) which is the culmination of our efforts to physically unite bamboo enthusiasts and professionals. In the name of bamboo, we bring people from around the world together to meet, discuss, network, collaborate, and exchange with the intention of improving understanding and stimulating potential. Ever since its inception in Puerto Rico in 1984, each World Bamboo Congress has convened a vast array of individuals, institutions, businesses, and decision makers, and has created new partnerships that have made a real difference for the environment, people and communities around the world. These events have been uniquely informative, educational, culturally and intellectually challenging. The events highlight the state-of-the-art in bamboo science, technology and industry.

 

Additionally, we sponsor celebrations, workshops, festivals, conferences, seminars, road races and competitions in honor ofWorld Bamboo Day, annually the week of September 18. For more information, go to our World Bamboo Day page and also our news stories relating to World Bamboo Day.


14102170_1085885634826826_5409608872638024060_n.jpg

South Asia Bamboo Foundation


South Asia bamboo Foundation (SABF) is a non-profit conservative action organization established to ensure livelihood support to the rural masses by using native bamboo species throughout South Asia.

SCROLL DOWN

South Asia Bamboo Foundation


South Asia bamboo Foundation (SABF) is a non-profit conservative action organization established to ensure livelihood support to the rural masses by using native bamboo species throughout South Asia.

South Asia Bamboo Foundation (SABF) is Trust registered under Indian Trust Act. and located in Guwahati, Assam , India an Associate for South Asia of the WBO , a non-profit trade association formed to facilitate the exchange of information from around the world on the environmental, socioeconomic, biological, and cultural aspects of bamboo. By bringing together local and regional bamboo people and creating mechanisms for global communication, WBO’s goal is to facilitate the development of new partnerships and alliances to advance the causes of bamboo and furthering the efforts of bamboo practitioners worldwide.

Our Mission - Linking Bamboo with Livelihood in South Asia

business-name-registration-1-728.jpg

Philippine Department of Trade & Industry


SCROLL DOWN

Philippine Department of Trade & Industry


HISTORY

 

The DTI had its beginnings on 23 June 1898 when President Emilio F. Aguinaldo formed four government agencies, namely the Departments of Navy, Commerce, Agriculture, and Manufacturing.

 

On 06 September 1901, the Philippine Commission established the Department of Commerce (and Police). After World War II, President Manuel A. Roxas issued Executive Order (EO) 94 on 04 October 1947, creating the Department of Commerce and Industry (DCI). Cornelio Balmaceda, a much sought-after Economics Professor and Bureau of Commerce (BOC) Director, was appointed Acting Secretary of the newly created Department of Commerce and Industry.

 

Prior to EO 94, the Bureau of Commerce was tasked to develop and promote the trade and industry of the country under the overall supervision of the Department of Agriculture and Commerce (Act 4007 on 05 December 1932 by the Philippine Legislature).

 

After 25 years, by 1972, DCI had grown into a big organization with 10 regular bureaus and 22 agencies under its direct supervision. The DCI was mandated to promote, develop, expand, regulate, and control foreign and domestic trade, industry, and tourism.

 

To have closer supervision and ensure more effective delivery of services, President Ferdinand E. Marcos issued Presidential Decree (PD) 189 on 11 May 1973, creating the Department of Tourism to handle all tourism-related matters.

 

A year later, 21 June 1974, Marcos issued PD 488 creating the Department of Industry whose principal function was to promote and enhance the growth of the existing and thriving industries in the country.

 

On 02 June 1975, the Department of Trade was created under PD 721 to pursue efforts of the government toward strengthening socio-economic development of the country, particularly in the area of commercial activities. A key strategy of the new department was vigorous export promotion to generate much needed foreign exchange (forex). A Bureau of Foreign Trade was also established to push for domestic trade and marketing programs.

 

In the early 80s, the national economic development goal of the Marcos government required the need to hew industrial promotion efforts with the expansion of Philippine trade overseas. This resulted in the creation on 27 July 1981 of the Ministry of Trade and Industry, which took over the functions of the subsequently abolished Departments of Trade and of Industry.

 

Drastic changes followed after the People Power Revolution. President Corazon C. Aquino signed on 27 February 1987 EO 133, reorganizing the Ministry of Trade and Industry and renaming it the Department of Trade and Industry (DTI).

 

In 2006, Secretary Peter B. Favila issued a Department Order officially declaring every 27 July of each year, the date and month the Ministry of Trade and the Ministry of Industry was first merged, as the DTI anniversary.


The DTI has five major functional groups composed of bureaus that provide support to DTI's line agencies and are involved in line operations, which deliver business and consumer services directly to the stakeholders and the public. These functional groups are:

Office of the Secretary (OSEC) - Provides full support and efficient coordination of information to the DTI Secretary and among the functional groups of the Department

Industry Promotion Group (IPG) - Promotes domestic and international trade and commerce

Industry Development Group (IDG) - In-charge of investment promotion in activities critical to the DTI's trade and industry development program

Consumer Protection Group (CPG) - In-charge of the enforcement of laws to protect consumers, consumer education, and formation of consumer groups

Regional Operations Group (ROG) - Responsible for the field operations of the DTI in the regions and provinces

Management Services Group (MSG) - Delivers effective, adequate, and timely services to clients in the shortest possible time and at the least cost. It also provides industry policies and coordinates and monitors the implementation of the operating plans and programs of the agenda provides an overall information and communication support